Posted by: nichemarketplace | November 24, 2008

Holiday shopping in a recessionary economy …

Holiday Gift Giving in a Recessionary Economy

Spare Giving -- Holiday Gift Giving in a Recessionary Economy (photo by Mother Pie)

Caption:  THE KEY TO HOLIDAY SHOPPING IN A RECESSIONARY ECONOMY IS CHOOSING GIFTS FROM THE HEART!

Santa is making a list and checking it twice all right. That is because — just like the rest of us — his holiday shopping budget has just taken a major hit.

Holiday shopping in a recessionary economy can be challenging, but troubled economic times only heighten the need for rejoicing and celebration. So before you swear off gift giving altogether, here is some expert advice to help you give generously even on a budget. What does it mean to give generously? Generosity is more than financial, it is spiritual. It is not the size of the gift, but the attitude of the giver that really matters. A heartfelt gift is always cherished by loved ones and appreciated by friends and co-workers. Giving generously is a mindset. Choosing a gift from the heart can be more difficult than merely finding an item in the dollar range that fits your budget. Meaningful gift giving requires effort, thought, and planning.

In an article entitled How to Give Christmas Gifts in a Recessionary Economy, terrific Seattle online writer Kristina Jensen emphasizes that the key to gift giving on a budget is to follow the old adage — It’s the thought that counts! “In times of economic instability, the gift you give doesn’t have to be the height of luxury. It just has to be thoughtful and aimed at the person you’re giving to.” eHow author and expert gift giver Kristina then goes on to suggest a strategy to help buyers in finding thoughtful, affordable gifts for their loved ones. “Consider each member of your family and all of your friends. Rather than ask, ‘What does my cousin most want?’ Ask [yourself] ‘What makes my cousin happy?’ Asking the question this way opens up a lot of new possibilities for Christmas gifts.”

To some degree or another, we are all making sacrifices to make ends meet. Often the first things that get cut are the personal indulgences — the little luxuries — that make life a bit sweeter. If your co-worker has recently started bringing coffee from home to save money, how much would he or she enjoy some Latte coupons? It may take some research on your part, but nothing is more appreciated than a gift that fills a genuine need.

Unquestionably the best holiday present I ever received was a video cassette recorder. It was a group gift. My entire family chipped in to purchase it and, as I recall, it was the only gift that I received that holiday season. At that time, I was a single mother with a young child who was working full-time. To say that I had no social life back then is an understatement. It was quite literally the perfect gift. Not because it was a top of the line, state of the art model, but because that video recorder was my lifeline during a very difficult time (remember there was no internet to speak of in the late ’80s). Each time I used it, I was reminded of my family’s unexpected thoughtfulness and generosity. Do you remember the best Christmas present you ever received? I would be willing to wager that it wasn’t the most expensive one you’ve ever gotten, rather it was the most meaningful — the one that touched your heart most profoundly.

In an article entitled How to Use Great Gift Ideas in a Recession, Lynn20 (another talented online writer who writes under her screen persona) echoes the importance of making thoughtful and heartfelt gift choices. She recommends choosing gifts that trigger fond memories of shared past experiences. “Think! Think about past conversations or experiences you have had with each person you want to give gifts.” Choose a gift that reminds you of some special memory that you shared with the recipient — something you remember that made them “embarrassingly happy, sad, furious, or excited … There is something that you can find … to bring the joy of WOW I THOUGHT YOU FORGOT ABOUT THAT!”

“The key here,” according to Lynn20, “is to either tell the story when they open the gift or write a reminder in the [gift] card.” Think about it … Who wouldn’t want to play the role of Ralphie in their own personal production of A Christmas Story? What could be more precious than a memento of days gone by? So this holiday season, put another yule log on the fire and add another old chestnut to the trove of treasured memories spent celebrating with family and friends. HAPPY HOLIDAYS!

Advertisements

Responses

  1. […] Holiday shopping in a recessionary economy … … are the personal indulgences — the little luxuries — that make life a bit sweeter. If your co-worker has recently started bringing coffee from home to save money, how much would he or she enjoy some Latte coupons? It may take some research on your part, but nothing is more appreciated than a gift that fills … […]

  2. I too was facing the issue of how to stretch my gift giving dollars and discovered craft project kits by this company called Foldin’ Money on Amazon.com and the name implies exactly what it is, money folded into designs such as cake, a shirt and a star. The directions were clear and easy to follow. I spent about $45 dollars to purchase the three kits and spent about another $30 in creating the folded money designs. Using fabric and stickers I had around the house, I decorated them in holiday themes for the people on my list. Now my Christmas shopping’s done and I’m excited about giving homemade gifts this year. But the best part is, it’s MONEY that they can spend because the designs unfold and the decorations come off.
    Hope that helps, Merry Christmas!
    Wes


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: